Effective Warm Ups | Lessonface

Effective Warm Ups

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Instructor
Effective Warm Ups

Do you warm up before your practice sessions? How about before your lessons? Do you have any warm up tips you'd like to share?

Warm ups are important to avoid injury and to ease into your playing each day. Try warming up at the beginning of each practice session, and before each lesson!

A great place to start is with long tones. Try starting with the medium range of your instrument. For flute, I usually start at the A on the staff. I hold the note for at least 6 beats before moving chromatically up to the G on top of the staff, giving each note in between 6 beats of solid, beautiful tone. Then, I return to the A and go down to the low C. Once I finish with all of that, I start on the G on top of the staff and go to the C above the staff. To end the long tones, I go from that C, to the highest D.

What do you begin your practice with?

Erika Andres
Instructor

My favorite warm ups for flute involve extended techniques.  I find that singing and playing, flutter tonguing, and harmonics are a great way to help you open up your throat and your sound and find your support right from the beginning.  I often play starting on F on the top of the staff and go down five notes in a major scale (F-Eb-D-C-Bb), then start on E, and from there follow the pattern all the way down to the lowest notes.  While doing this I will sing a low pitched drone or flutter tongue, or even both at the same time.  In order to get the lowest notes out, my throat and embouchure has to be very relaxed and my sound open and free.  This keeps me from developing unwanted tension.  I also practice starting on low C and playing the first five notes of the scale and back (C-D-E-F-G-F-E-D-C) several times, then I continue the pattern with the same fingerings but go up the harmonics.  I then do the same thing starting on D.  The trick is to play it very softly but clearly.  This practice helps me find support for my sound.  Afterwards, I do scales and other technical work to find my fingers and get my brain going.